HOW TO USE FEEDBACK ON YOUR ESSAY EFFECTIVELY

 

Pat Maier (Lecturer, Learning and Teaching Coordinator) gives expert video advice on: How can I use feedback effectively?

HOW CAN I USE FEEDBACK EFFECTIVELY?

Your tutors will give you feedback on the work that you do. Usually there’s a timeframe within which they should provide feedback to you. When you get your feedback, it’s important to look at it in terms of how you can improve the next piece of work. You may say the feedback only applies to this piece of work and not the next piece of work. The important thing for you is to look at whether there anything you can take from this feedback that’s generic enough that can be used in another piece of work. So, for example, is your writing bad? Do you tend to have sloppy results? Do you make arithmetic errors across many of your pieces of coursework? You need to look and see if there’s some pattern in the feedback for you. If you’re not getting the feedback you want, it might be a good idea to ask your tutor for the particular feedback that you want.

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Cloud computing is a trap, warns GNU founder | Technology | The Guardian

 

Larry Ellison, the founder of Oracle, who criticised the rash of cloud computing announcements as “fashion-driven” and “complete gibberish”.”The interesting thing about cloud computing is that we’ve redefined cloud computing to include everything that we already do,” he said. “The computer industry is the only industry that is more fashion-driven than women’s fashion. Maybe I’m an idiot, but I have no idea what anyone is talking about. What is it? It’s complete gibberish. It’s insane. When is this idiocy going to stop?”

via Cloud computing is a trap, warns GNU founder | Technology | The Guardian.

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BBC – Blogs – College of Journalism – Investigative apps are useful tools for journalists, if rough around the edges

 

There are a lot of websites out there that can help you find hidden information. But there are also software applications and browser plug-ins that can be of use to investigative journalists.

Created by up-and-coming developers and enthusiasts on a budget, many of these programmes are rather unsophisticated, so don’t expect slick interfaces and 24-hour help desks.

That said, if you can get past the jargon and rough-and-ready feel, you’ll find nifty little apps that can help you discover nuggets of information which would be unavailable through conventional means.

Many alternatives are available and, while I’m not personally endorsing the programmes featured here, they can be useful tools. And in terms of BBC investigative journalism they’d have to be used according to our editorial guidelines:

via BBC – Blogs – College of Journalism – Investigative apps are useful tools for journalists, if rough around the edges.

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Do we really need all those endless updates to iTunes? | Technology | The Guardian

 

Do we really need all those endless updates to iTunes? | Technology | The Guardian.

“What’s happened to the song list?” Complaints of that sort have been loud and long since Apple updated iTunes in October. The new version is officially iTunes12 – though there have been so many tenth-, hundredth- and thousandth-decimal releases since it was first officially unveiled in January 2001 that the real revision figure is probably in the hundreds.

 

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BBC Sport – Mario Balotelli: Liverpool striker sorry for Instagram post

 

The radio reports this morning told this story with a different slant. It was implied that Balotelli had tweeted the text and there was no context given to explain that it was actually a poster re-published rather than his own words.

The last line of the text attaches a negative attribute to jewish people as a group which is where the racism is.

BBC Sport – Mario Balotelli: Liverpool striker sorry for Instagram post.

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Vine shifts from comedy clips to a valid journalistic tool | Media | The Guardian

 

Vine shifts from comedy clips to a valid journalistic tool | Media | The Guardian.

Just before Channel 4 News’s chief correspondent Alex Thomson set off on a reporting assignment to Ebola-hit Sierra Leone earlier this month, one of the show’s digital producers pulled him aside and suggested he should “do some Vines” while he was there. “I looked at him blankly,” says Thomson. “Images of vineyards floated into my head.”

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What’s the right relationship between technology companies and journalism? | Media | The Guardian

 

Last week a Silicon Valley billionaire asked me a question. Not, unfortunately, “what are your bank details?”, but something rather more testing: “Name one way in which journalism companies are not the same as software companies.”

via What’s the right relationship between technology companies and journalism? | Media | The Guardian.

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What a virtual reality art show could say about the future of games | Technology | The Guardian

 

For the past decade, cognitive neuroscientists have been studying the concept of “body transfer illusion”, the idea that the brain can be “tricked” into taking ownership of a body or body part that it is not one’s own. Through affordable VR headsets such as the Oculus Rift and Sony’s forthcoming Project Morpheus, we may all soon be given the chance to project our identities beyond cyberspace; to inhabit different bodies. It could be that this experiment, although extreme, may signpost where we’re all heading.

via What a virtual reality art show could say about the future of games | Technology | The Guardian.

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Rate the aesthetic value of the third website

 

https://www.myvessyl.com/

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Rate the aesthetic value of the second website

 

http://www.easyart.com/

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