Category Archives: Journalism

Blogging for more! Magazine

Piles of books, plenty of essays and numerous lectures, there was no time for work experience. How wrong I was! Blogging for more! magazine whilst studying a degree is not something I ever imagined doing, but it is possible. Selected from hundreds of applicants to be a blogger for more! I have been regularly writing for them online since June 2011. I came across the position of a mini-blogger through more! magazines website and their Facebook page. The position was to write online during the summer for three months June – August 2011. I managed and worked within tight deadlines, researched internet sources and social networking sites for inspiration to ensure that blogs were topical, original and humorous. This opportunity allowed me to make further contacts and developed active relationships with readers and organisations online. My blogs formed online debates and discussions. They were recognised and complimented by readers, companies and others through regular feedback.

As a result of my blogging over the period of three months, more! asked me to Interview British television personality Keith Lemon (Leigh Francis) for them alongside comedian Alan Carr, which was published online on more! magazine’s Intern blog. This resulted in positive feedback from readers and Keith Lemon himself through twitter. This experience proved to more! I was prepared at short notice and was able to work under pressure. I learnt how to be spontaneous with interview questions and this led to further work when more! commissioned me to represent and report at Essex Fashion Week. This experience has expanded my networks with publicists, models, journalists and fashion designers.

This whole experience has challenged me and given me the confidence I need to graduate this year and hopefully land my dream job in the magazine industry. I learnt that contacts are essential and make yourself stand out from the crowd by being persistent and hardworking. My best advice is to be fearless, as it is no ‘Devil Wears Prada’ the more! team are just lovely.

All my work can be found at: http://undercoveressexgirl.tumblr.com/

By Charlotte Jones studying BA Humanities degree in Journalism, English Literature, Media Cultures and Creative Writing. Third year student.

Blogging for more! magazine

Here is another piece by one of our Third Year Students, Charlotte Jones

Charlotte with her new friends
Another day at the office: Keith Lemon, Charlotte Jones and Alan Carr

Piles of books, plenty of essays and numerous lectures, there was no time for work experience. How wrong I was! Blogging for more! magazine whilst studying a degree is not something I ever imagined doing, but it is possible. Selected from hundreds of applicants to be a blogger for more! I have been regularly writing for them online since June 2011. I came across the position of a mini-blogger through more! magazines website and their Facebook page. The position was to write online during the summer for three months June – August 2011. I managed and worked within tight deadlines, researched internet sources and social networking sites for inspiration to ensure that blogs were topical, original and humorous. This opportunity allowed me to make further contacts and developed active relationships with readers and organisations online. My blogs formed online debates and discussions. They were recognised and complimented by readers, companies and others through regular feedback.
As a result of my blogging over the period of three months, more! asked me to Interview British television personality Keith Lemon (Leigh Francis) for them alongside comedian Alan Carr, which was published online on more! magazine’s Intern blog. This resulted in positive feedback from readers and Keith Lemon himself through twitter. This experience proved to more! I was prepared at short notice and was able to work under pressure. I learnt how to be spontaneous with interview questions and this led to further work when more! commissioned me to represent and report at Essex Fashion Week. This experience has expanded my networks with publicists, models, journalists and fashion designers.
This whole experience has challenged me and given me the confidence I need to graduate this year and hopefully land my dream job in the magazine industry. I learnt that contacts are essential and make yourself stand out from the crowd by being persistent and hardworking. My best advice is to be fearless, as it is no ‘Devil Wears Prada’ the more! team are just lovely.
All my work can be found at: http://undercoveressexgirl.tumblr.com/

By Charlotte Jones studying BA Humanities degree in Journalism, English Literature, Media Cultures and Creative Writing. Third year student.

Media Moguls clash over the power of social media

Here is an interesting news story written by one of our Third Year Journalism students, Charlotte Jones

Charlotte JonesFormer editor of The News of the World Phil Hall and high profile publicist Max Clifford disagreed over the power of social media recently at a Parliamentary committee enquiring into Privacy and Injunctions.
Hall who is now chairman of PR agency PHA Media said: “As newspaper circulations fall and the internet gets a greater following, the emphasis of the power will change.” He suggested social media is a fear for the privacy of not only celebrities, but of the general public.
Hall pointed out social media is highly influential and can damage an individual’s reputation irreparably. He said: “I have had clients blackmailed on Twitter and pursued around the world on Google… Google and Twitter are far more dangerous to my clients than newspapers.”
He added: “There must be some policing, because there is one law for the print media and no law for the social networking groups… social media at the moment seem to be able to do what they want and hide behind free speech.”
Giving evidence at the committee alongside Hall, publicist Max Clifford disagreed: “Twitter does not have the same credibility…national ¬press is far more powerful.”
Clifford cited the case of Robert Murat who had been falsely accused over the disappearance of Madeline McCann. Clifford told the committee how Robert came to him after being destroyed by the British Media. He said: “If it’s on the front page of the national newspaper… the vast majority of people are either believing it or are influenced by it.”
“Once they are destroyed it is for the rest of their lives they are labelled,” he said.
He fiercely attacked The Press Complaints Commission claiming they were not remotely interested in the case of Robert Murat, “To me the PCC has never existed.”
Hall defended the PCC, he said: “They have been very effective.” But added: “We need a PCC with more teeth.”
The committee asked if legislation could help, Hall said: “There could not be a statutory system because there are so many different circumstances.”
Clifford called for greater protection for members of the public as they do not have the money or ability for a super-injunction. He said: “It is a law purely for the rich and powerful people which in a democracy is wrong…everybody has the right to privacy… the rich and famous have more than enough protection.”
Whilst not agreeing on everything there was agreement between Hall and Clifford in the need for regulation and they pressed MP’s to consider the need for the creation of a new independent complaints body, to provide a “halfway house” between public interest and everybody’s right to privacy “that is not in the pockets of Fleet Street.” This body would oversee social media and the print press.
Clifford hoped that one of the outcomes of the Committee’s meetings would be the establishment of a: “a pro-active Press Complaints body that is good for the press as well as the public.”

All my Charlottes work can be found at: http://undercoveressexgirl.tumblr.com/

Features Example 3

Whose identity is it anyway?

For Marie Claire

The newly paved drives are laden with expensive cars, flash Mercedes, convertible Audi’s and BMW’s. Peering through the windows laced with lavish curtains, the trendy décor is evident with bold colours reflecting off the large plasma screen televisions. On each of the detached houses on this quiet cul-de-sac in Bushmead, Luton, security alarms flash like quaint Christmas lights to deter burglars. But today, crooks are having an easier time. We’re throwing away credit checks with crisp packets, bank statements with banana skins and we’re giving our personal information away to any Jo Bloggs online. Criminals are  stealing the most important possession we have- our identities.
Identity theft or impersonation fraud is the misuse of a person’s identity such as their name, date of birth or address without their consent. The crime costs the UK economy £1.7 billion which works out as £35 per adult per year.

It took Kelly Poon, a 25-year-old fashion buyer from the sleepy suburb in Luton six years to realise that she had fallen victim to the crime. “When I move out of University halls, I lost my folder that I kept my passport and birth certificate in it. I reported it to the passport agency but I didn’t know who to contact about the birth certificate so in the end, I just forgot about it” she said. Two years after graduating from Bournemouth university, Kelly tried to get a mortgage with her partner Martin, a 27-year-old IT consultant from London. “We kept getting rejected so my broker advised me to get a credit check. When it came though, it turned out that I was £7000 in debt. I was shocked. I didn’t have a credit card at university as my parents helped me out with money so I had no idea where the debt had come from.” The passport and birth certificate Kelly lost were used to open up a bank account in her name. “When it was eventually proven that I had my identity stolen, the bank dropped the debt but it still affects me now. I used to do most of my shopping on line but now, the thought of having someone stealing my identity puts me off using it.”

Worryingly, Kelly is not alone. She’s one of the six million people in Britain who believe they have been a victim of identity theft. And this figure is likely to rise. A report by gas and electricity provider Npower is warning that the number of Brits who are fleeced by identity crooks each year will double to 200,000 by 2010. The survey also shows that 18-39 year olds are the main victims and perpetrators of the crime with the majority of victims being women. Zoe Coombs, spokesperson for Npower said: “Women in their early twenties are at a higher risk of becoming victims of identity theft as they’re more likely to be nomadic, living in rented property or moving out of university halls. However, women in their late twenties and early thirties are also at a higher risk as they show little restraint when it comes to sharing personal information.”
Despite most victims of identity theft knowing their perpetrator, more than two thirds of women aged between twenty-five and thirty years-old have given their friends or family pin codes for cash cards or usernames and passwords for online banking. Criminologist Emma Finch says “People behave really naively on the internet. We wouldn’t tell strangers in the street our bank details so it shouldn’t be any different when we’re online. Fraudsters are using Internet dating chat rooms and shopping websites to get personal details so never disclose anything to anyone. Always think are my details safe with you?”

Online identity theft has become a multi-billion pound industry for hackers and now organised gangs are getting in on the act as well. Phishing is the latest scam, where fraudulent emails pretending to be from banks are used to get account details. Once obtained, these details are then used to operate accounts fraudulently. A survey from BT shows that almost half of 18-30 year old women in the UK do not know what phishing is and 61% have only one password for all of their accounts. Mathew Hart, a spokesperson for BT said: “Change passwords frequently and have novel ones, too many people have passwords that are easy to guess and the most popular is the word password itself.”

Last year, Marion Tooley, a project manager from St Albans received a phone call from her bank after expensive items were purchased using her card. “I was on my lunch break and got a call from the bank asking to confirm that I was on a shopping trip and had just spent £550 on my card. At first, I thought it had been a friend messing about.” A few days earlier, Marion received an email asking to confirm her personal banking details. She replied; giving her account detail, sort code and security number. “I had never even heard of this type of identity theft before, I just thought that it was a routine email being sent out by the bank to al customers” she said.

Melanie Mitchley, Director of Industry Relations at Callcredit said: “Banks or companies such as Ebay or Amazon will never ask for your personal details in an email. It’s so easy to make an authentic looking email, all it takes is the company logo and font and most people are fooled.”
Despite the launch of the Home Office campaign in 2005 to combat the problem of identity theft, a third of Britons are still throwing away personal documents without shredding them and a quarter admit to not checking their bank statements.

Last year, in the UK, stolen identities were used to conduct 2500 sham marriages, 3500 fake licences and 1600 counterfeit passports. Martin Gill, identity theft specialist and Professor of Criminology at the University of Leicester said: “Official statistics relating to cases of identity theft are not indicative of the true scale of this growing crime as many cases go unrecorded or undetected. It’s easy for a thief to steal someone’s identity and as research indicates, people under thirty are not as cautious as they should be when it comes to safeguarding their own personal details and those of others. At that age, it isn’t really seen as important. “ Martin warns women in particular to take more responsibility over their personal information. “If a criminal gets their hands on your credit rating, they can get up to £60,000 in credit. Throw away things with your details on and they can get £10,000 out of your savings and loose a passport or driving license and they can make counterfeit ones which have street values of £5,000 each. That means that the average person’s identity is worth £80,000- so look after it, it’s something worth protecting. “

Features Example 2

To de Hav of not to de Hav? That is the question.

By David Houssien


To de Hav or not to de Hav? That is the question. Why is it that only around 3,700 of the University’s 24,000 students choose to live on campus, while others prefer to stay at home or find their own accommodation? Aside from some of the simple explanations such as the University only guaranteeing first year students accommodation and the number of part-time students and students who already live in Hatfield, there are other reasons.

A room on the de Havilland campus will set you back £93 per week, and rates at College Lane vary between £59 and £83 per week, which essentially adds up to £372 per month at de Havilland or £236 to £332 at College Lane. Prices for renting in Stevenage, Hatfield and Welwyn Garden City for accommodation of the same or better standard, on rightmove.co.uk, are between £500 and £650 per month.

The initial reaction to that is: why should I pay more money? But the truth is you’re not. On de Havilland, a flat is shared between 10 to 12 people. Sure, you get your own room and an en suite bathroom, but simple maths tells us that the price of the flat is actually falls between £3720 and £4464 per month. One person’s share of £372 per month isn’t a lot of money in the wider letting world, but I’m renting a 1 bedroom flat at £550 per month – and split between myself and partner it’s £275 per month. You’d have to be mad to pay more money for less space and share a kitchen with strangers.

There’s a counter argument that anyone renting privately has added bills and University accommodation includes bills. That is true. Internet, water, electricity, TV licence… it all adds up, but you can control it to a certain degree, and at University you cannot. Why should you pay a fixed rate for utilities when others may be less careful than yourself? Taps left running, computer left on all night, phone charger left turned on; does this sound familiar? If you’re careful with water and electricity, you’re still paying for those who are not, and even if the whole campus reduced its waste, water and electricity usage, don’t expect rates to drop. If you’re renting privately, or even living at home, it’s you and your partner, flatmate or family who benefit from lower bills, not Carillion.

Adam Jones-Lloyd, a first year Humanities students who lives in Cuffley agrees: “By living at home, it’s a great deal cheaper. Herts is a good uni and I live close enough to justify not staying in halls. I get the benefits of living at home, for instance, access to my car, home comforts and I’m not confined to just one room.”

If you’re living at home and lock yourself out, your parents probably won’t charge you £30 to open the door. If you’re renting privately and lock yourself out, it’s doubtful that your landlord will charge you £30 if you go and get the spare key. If you lock yourself out of your de Havilland room after one warning, you will be charged £30. That’s right, if you slip up more than once, it costs £30 to get someone to go to your room and let you back in. The whole process takes around 10 minutes.

Last year, it cost de Havilland tenants £5 to get a key to lock their cupboard. This was in the form of a £10 deposit, of which only £5 was returned. It’s every bit as ridiculous as it sounds. It’s not really clear why, other than another form of exploiting students. It may be a very small amount of money, but 1600 students multiplied by £5 each is a lot of money for nothing.

Louie French, a first year Humanities student commented “I feel that living in halls is very expensive and products on campus are overpriced.” But it’s not all doom and gloom on de Havilland, as he added “I don’t regret living on campus because of the people I have met. The benefits of living on campus are the excellent facilities and the atmosphere around campus.”

An advantage of living on campus is the social life, but you don’t really miss out if you’re living off campus. If you’re staying in your home town, you probably already have friends there, and many of the towns in Hertfordshire have lots of bars and clubs. For example, there are 14 pubs within a 10 minute walk of each other in Stevenage Old Town, one of the biggest clubs in Hertfordshire about 15 minutes away and many restaurants.

However, living off campus doesn’t come without disadvantages. If you’re at home, you have less privacy and the added stress of dealing with your family on a day to day basis. If you choose to find your own accommodation you will have to view many properties before you find one you like and at the price you’d like to pay. When you’ve finally found your dream student pad, there could be 10 other people who also want it. This is a big problem; landlords who do not specialise in student lettings do not like students at all. They like middle class professionals who work in London, and cause very little wear and tear on the property because they’re never home. Prejudice against students is widespread and that’ll give you no end of trouble when you’re trying to rent privately. Not to mention the hassle of passing the reference based on your projected student loan and part-time work.

Another downfall is the traffic for those who travel in by road. The A1 is a major route, and if there’s an accident you’re guaranteed to be late. If you’re not an early bird, it can be a bit of a problem too as you have to get up early enough to give yourself enough time to get to Hatfield and then park and ride if you’re driving. Those living on campus can just roll out of bed and into their lectures, with the advantage of an extra bit of sleep and feeling a bit sharper.

Ultimately, the evidence for not living on campus is overwhelming. Although finding yourself a property to rent and finding a bigger deposit is stressful, as is living with family, it’s worth it. More space, more luxuries, less noise, no lockout charge, no using the cupboard charge, space for a bigger television and no sharing a kitchen with strangers who will leave it in a mess. To answer the original question; not to de Hav!

To de Hav or not to de Hav? That is the question. Why is it that only around 3,700 of the University’s 24,000 students choose to live on campus, while others prefer to stay at home or find their own accommodation? Aside from some of the simple explanations such as the University only guaranteeing first year students accommodation and the number of part-time students and students who already live in Hatfield, there are other reasons.

A room on the de Havilland campus will set you back £93 per week, and rates at College Lane vary between £59 and £83 per week, which essentially adds up to £372 per month at de Havilland or £236 to £332 at College Lane. Prices for renting in Stevenage, Hatfield and Welwyn Garden City for accommodation of the same or better standard, on rightmove.co.uk, are between £500 and £650 per month.

The initial reaction to that is: why should I pay more money? But the truth is you’re not. On de Havilland, a flat is shared between 10 to 12 people. Sure, you get your own room and an en suite bathroom, but simple maths tells us that the price of the flat is actually falls between £3720 and £4464 per month. One person’s share of £372 per month isn’t a lot of money in the wider letting world, but I’m renting a 1 bedroom flat at £550 per month – and split between myself and partner it’s £275 per month. You’d have to be mad to pay more money for less space and share a kitchen with strangers.

There’s a counter argument that anyone renting privately has added bills and University accommodation includes bills. That is true. Internet, water, electricity, TV licence… it all adds up, but you can control it to a certain degree, and at University you cannot. Why should you pay a fixed rate for utilities when others may be less careful than yourself? Taps left running, computer left on all night, phone charger left turned on; does this sound familiar? If you’re careful with water and electricity, you’re still paying for those who are not, and even if the whole campus reduced its waste, water and electricity usage, don’t expect rates to drop. If you’re renting privately, or even living at home, it’s you and your partner, flatmate or family who benefit from lower bills, not Carillion.

Adam Jones-Lloyd, a first year Humanities students who lives in Cuffley agrees: “By living at home, it’s a great deal cheaper. Herts is a good uni and I live close enough to justify not staying in halls. I get the benefits of living at home, for instance, access to my car, home comforts and I’m not confined to just one room.”

If you’re living at home and lock yourself out, your parents probably won’t charge you £30 to open the door. If you’re renting privately and lock yourself out, it’s doubtful that your landlord will charge you £30 if you go and get the spare key. If you lock yourself out of your de Havilland room after one warning, you will be charged £30. That’s right, if you slip up more than once, it costs £30 to get someone to go to your room and let you back in. The whole process takes around 10 minutes.

Last year, it cost de Havilland tenants £5 to get a key to lock their cupboard. This was in the form of a £10 deposit, of which only £5 was returned. It’s every bit as ridiculous as it sounds. It’s not really clear why, other than another form of exploiting students. It may be a very small amount of money, but 1600 students multiplied by £5 each is a lot of money for nothing.

Louie French, a first year Humanities student commented “I feel that living in halls is very expensive and products on campus are overpriced.” But it’s not all doom and gloom on de Havilland, as he added “I don’t regret living on campus because of the people I have met. The benefits of living on campus are the excellent facilities and the atmosphere around campus.”

An advantage of living on campus is the social life, but you don’t really miss out if you’re living off campus. If you’re staying in your home town, you probably already have friends there, and many of the towns in Hertfordshire have lots of bars and clubs. For example, there are 14 pubs within a 10 minute walk of each other in Stevenage Old Town, one of the biggest clubs in Hertfordshire about 15 minutes away and many restaurants.

However, living off campus doesn’t come without disadvantages. If you’re at home, you have less privacy and the added stress of dealing with your family on a day to day basis. If you choose to find your own accommodation you will have to view many properties before you find one you like and at the price you’d like to pay. When you’ve finally found your dream student pad, there could be 10 other people who also want it. This is a big problem; landlords who do not specialise in student lettings do not like students at all. They like middle class professionals who work in London, and cause very little wear and tear on the property because they’re never home. Prejudice against students is widespread and that’ll give you no end of trouble when you’re trying to rent privately. Not to mention the hassle of passing the reference based on your projected student loan and part-time work.

Another downfall is the traffic for those who travel in by road. The A1 is a major route, and if there’s an accident you’re guaranteed to be late. If you’re not an early bird, it can be a bit of a problem too as you have to get up early enough to give yourself enough time to get to Hatfield and then park and ride if you’re driving. Those living on campus can just roll out of bed and into their lectures, with the advantage of an extra bit of sleep and feeling a bit sharper.

Ultimately, the evidence for not living on campus is overwhelming. Although finding yourself a property to rent and finding a bigger deposit is stressful, as is living with family, it’s worth it. More space, more luxuries, less noise, no lockout charge, no using the cupboard charge, space for a bigger television and no sharing a kitchen with strangers who will leave it in a mess. To answer the original question; not to de Hav!

Features Example 1

 

Bitten by the Vampire Bug!
Why dead guys have gone from cold to HOT!

By Hannah Streatfield

Next generation vamp-mania is on the outbreak and there is no stopping it, the whole world appears to be under its thrall and it is unlikely to be going away anytime soon.

With at least two more Twilight films in production (Possibly three by splitting the fourth book Harry Potter style)  and at least five more seasons of HBO’s True Blood there are still years to come of the dead walking upon our screens.

However this fixation with blood-suckers hasn’t appeared out of nowhere, girls have been obsessed with vampires for years. Last time vampires resurfaced it was the 90’s. Posters of Buffy and the gang adorned the walls of any vamp-loving-teen and Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles teetered in precarious towers on bookshelves.

Now it’s mutated into sparkly vegetarian vampires, artificial blood and raunchy southern sex.  But why is it that this sub-genre keeps resurfacing? And what makes it so prevalent within youth culture?

Prolific author Anne Rice sheds some light on why she thinks the vampire genre is so successful and what it is that gets the girls going gaga for the hunky demons.
“I don’t really know why people are so crazy about vampires right now. Except that the concept has always had this potential.  It’s a Supernatural monster that was human and still looks human and can be spoken to. Not only can you speak to a vampire and he can speak back to you. You can fall in love with him and vice versa.”

She goes on to say: “Twilight strikes me as a female romance in the mould of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte: young girl falls in love with older mysterious figure that is both protective and menacing.  It’s a tried and true formula, and has always worked, and now Stephanie Meyer has done it in a new way, using a vampire in high school as the older man.”

No one ever has the hots for Frankenstein or drools over zombies. So maybe Anne Rice is right, girls feel a connection with vamps because they have the danger and mystery of the supernatural but with an attractive human facade. But it also taps in to the anarchistic feeling of being a young teen. Basically vampires can be seen as the ultimate fantasy ‘bad boy’ and the very embodiment of teenage rebellion. Not only are they pale, older and stay up all night. But they drink blood!

Shame about them being fictional or it would definitely be two fingers up to the over protective parent.

Member of the Buffy forum on TV.com Chris Michaelson says: “Well obviously there are plenty of reasons why people like them. I think vampires are admired because they are a symbol of freedom. They are never governed by human laws and can do pretty much what they want.

He continues: “As for girls, don’t they all love the tall, dark and handsome guy? There’s a romantic side to it I guess. Plus girls tend to like older more experienced men, whereas men tend to like younger women. Still not sure how these movies and shows are not flagged as paedophilia as the vampires in Buffy, Vampire Diaries and Twilight are all about older vamps and underage girls, but since they don’t age I guess they can get away with it.”

Twihards and other vampire fans are not restricted to the younger generation. Even though Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight series was aimed at the teen target market it has crossed demographic and into the hearts of older age groups.

Introducing Twilight Moms… A website dedicated to older women and mothers just as obsessed about the series as their younger counterparts. The site has a whopping 34,000 active members which has been steadily inclining since the release of the films to the big screen.  It has been reported that a large percentage of New Moon ticket sales have been purchased by women older than Summit Entertainment’s intended teens and tweens, that the films were originally marketed towards.

Does that mean that in the future we’ll see Edward and the crew advertising a nice bottle of Merlot for these ladies? Probably not, as the original marketing seems to be bringing the older gen into the cinemas just as well.

A bi-product of this is the swarms of Emmetts, Jaspers and Rosalies newly born and named after the characters, these unusual names will undoubtedly be gracing the classroom in a few years.  TV.com user Lucy Smith comments on this phenomenon. “As for people naming their children after currently famous vamps, that particular pattern is not at all restricted to blood suckers. Whatever the current craze may be, you can bet that new parents will follow the lead and name their offspring after whom or whatever is the current trend.”

She continues: Famous young actors and actresses of the time will also have their names used by new mums and, of course, the Twilight mums, but it’s really not about vamps, it’s about what’s popular.”

A world away from screaming tweens and vampires on their best behaviour is Alan Ball’s adaptation of Charlene Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse books.

True blood is all about the sex and violence and is definitely a breath of fresh air from the usual vampire high school romance.It ‘s a nitty-gritty vampire horror which is unquestionably intended for an older market and it seems to be successfully reclaiming the genre to a modern adult audience.

Anne Rice gives her thoughts on the show: “True Blood is clever and satirical and witty, and iconoclastic. On the surface it demystifies vampires by putting them in mundane situations and goes for “what if” laughs. It’s fresh and clever and the show on HBO is delightfully funny while providing very strong characters with whom the audience can identify.  I would say it is one show in which the humans are as interesting as the vampires.”

Truth is the vampire obsession is just a fantasy. Whether it is teenagers wishing they had a creature of the night to whisk them away and give them more power or housewives and mothers needing an escape from the mundane. But it is these elements of fantasy that keep the genre alive and will continue to do so for a long time.